Our Misson

Our foundation is focused on helping families in our local community; by assisting with the financial strain of caring for their loved ones suffering from Glioblastoma Multiform and other types of cancers. 



​News

Gayle Sheldon Memorial Foundation


 For Brain Cancer, Inc.

OUR EVENTS

OUR GOAL

 

$15,000 FOR 2015

We are  determined to raise it, but we can not do it alone. WE NEED YOUR HELP! Everyone day every year someone is diagnosed with cancer, whether it is you, a family member, friend, neighbor or co-worker, and it is devastating to everyone around them. Most families are not prepared for this financially. This is why we do what we do; raise much need funds to help when people most need it. 



Dear  Supporter,

I would like to introduce our foundation to you. We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization which was established in 2008 by the family and friends of Gayle Sheldon one year after she passed away from Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. 


Our motto is: “The chance of a lifetime is to give life a chance”. 


Our foundation raises money by obtaining donations from corporations, small business and  people like you.

In the pasted our benefit ride, family fun day and other events has brought in over $10,000, to help the cancer patients. With these contributions we are able to purchase gas cards, food cards, medicine not covered by insurance, caregivers for the home, rent or mortgage payments, among other services.  These fund not only help our local community but people in other states that has needed help. 


What is a Glioblastoma?

Brain tumors belong to a group of diverse tumors that affect the brain and spinal cord known ascentral nervous system neoplasms. A brain tumor is a mass of abnormal cells in the brain that have grown and multiplied in an uncontrolled fashion. Brain tumors that develop from various types of cells that make up the brain are called primary brain tumors. These types of brain tumors are usually localized (confined) to the brain itself and only rarely spread to other parts of the body. Metastatic brain tumors, also know as secondary brain tumors, originate from cancer cells in another part of the body (e.g., lung, breast) and spread to the brain through the bloodstream. The distinction between primary and secondary brain tumors is important from a clinical perspective because they are usually treated differently.

Approximately 50% of all primary brain tumors originate from specialized nerve cells in the brain called glial cells. Brain tumors that arise from glial cells are called gliomas. There are many different types of gliomas but the most common gliomas develop from glial cells calledastrocytes. Primary brain tumors that develop from astrocytes are referred to as astrocytomas.

The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies astrocytomas into four distinct grades designated as Grade I, II, III, and IV (discussed in detail below) on the basis of how quickly the cells grow and spread and how the cells appear under a microscope. A glioblastoma, technically know as glioblastoma multiforme, is the fastest growing type of astrocytoma (Grade IV astrocytoma) that quickly spreads and invades nearby normal brain tissue and contains areas of dead cells (necrosis) in the center of the tumor.

Approximately 18,000 people in the United States are diagnosed each year with a malignant (cancerous) primary brain tumor. Glioblastoma multiforme (GM) is the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor in adults and accounts for about 50% to 60% of cases. Although GM can occur in all age groups, it is most commonly observed in adults 50 to 70 years in age. Less than 10% of childhood brain tumors are glioblastomas. Glioblastoma multiforme tends to occur more frequently in males than females by a ratio of about 3:2. According to the American Cancer Society, about 13,000 in the United States die each year from primary brain tumors.. 


Using Polio To Kill Cancer


Experimental cancer therapy extends woman's life by 9 years




The 7th Annual Gayle Sheldon Benefit Ride

 

Sunday  August 30, 2015

From the Killington Classic

in Killington Vermont.


Please call 802.773.2814

or email gaylesheldongbm@gmail.com for more information